Name Game
Mentalfloss.com’s recent post identified seventeen literary characters whose working names didn’t make it to the final publication.
Breakfast at Tiffany’s just would not have been the same if Holly Golightly had been named Connie Gustafson. The book description on the Kindle Store webpage states:

Truman Capote created a woman whose name has entered the American idiom and whose style is a part of the literary landscape.

 
“Connie Gustafson” could have never pulled that off.
My personal favorite was Gone with the Wind’s Scarlett O’Hara, who narrowly escaped being Pansy. Really? Rhett Butler could not have fallen for a woman named Pansy. Ashley, yes. But Rhett, never.
Who doesn’t love Little Orphan Annie, but Little Orphan Otto? Thank goodness curly red hair brought about the name and gender change.
I’ve read books with characters whose names just didn’t work for me. My own little quirk is that grown men should not be known by names like Ricky, Billy, or Jimmy. They sound childish to me as I prefer the more grown-up names of Rick, Bill and Jim.
Predictable names don’t bother me – cowboys named Dusty and Buck or Englishmen named Sebastian and Clive. Lead male characters named Lucifer, Demon, or Trinity are just creepy.
Women characters named Destiny, Chastity, or Nevaeh (Heaven spelled backwards) – too cutesy. In historical novels, the name has to match the period. A Regency heroine named Heather ruined a book for me. Ditto for the contemporary novel starring Lavender.
Have you read a book where the name just didn’t fit in your mind? Or couldn’t finish a book because of the names? What about a name you fell in love with and named your child or pet the same? Tell us about it.
 
Rumors and more rumors
The Wall Street Journal through wsj.com has a story about the upcoming Kindle Phone, which is supposedly being developed and will be larger than four inches.
•pcworld.com has an article about the look of the next Kindle. Backlit and color e-ink are features being rumored.
•Finally, technobuffalo.com reported on a survey where more than 50% of Kindle Fire owners intend to purchase an iPad 3. My personal opinion is that once you become a tablet user, you integrate the device into your life and start looking for a tablet with more features. If the Kindle Fire draws a consumer to buy a tablet and they then buy an iPad, does Apple owe Amazon a 30% commission?
 
Cheap Reads – Short Story Collections
HarperCollins has reduced the price on short story collections normally priced above $10 to just $1.99 each. The three books below are available to download now for $1.99 each.