The Big Love is in the best tradition of chick lit. Alison Hopkins is stunned when her live-in boyfriend, surely preparing to propose, goes out to pick up mustard, then calls to announce he is in love with someone else.
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Alison tumbles through a number of reactions and tries to scrape her life together. She narrates the story in a chatty breathless style that feels a lot like a long telephone call. Like this:

I suppose if I had been exposed to Dorothy Parker at an impressionable age she would have been who I wanted to grow up to be, but we didn’t get Dorothy Parker in Arizona when I was growing up; we got Nora Ephron. Who I proceeded to want to grow up to be. I didn’t find out until years later – after I’d been exposed to Dorothy Parker myself and had begun to idly contemplate attempting to become her – that Nora Ephron had wanted to grow up to be Dorothy Parker, which made me quite pleased.

When Alison tells us her therapist thinks she’s a narcissist, it’s easy to believe.
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The heroine goes through all the angst of modern romance, with one very interesting twist – she was raised an evangelical Christian. Even though she rejects many of those conventions, some of those elements are still very meaningful and she tries to reconcile them with her choices and yet still find love.
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The Big Love is light and fun and easy to read, although the end was a little less than satisfying. The author raised some interesting questions about romance and faith, but this is no way a Christian book, with a few uses of choice language to emphasize that.
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The book was offered previously on DailyCheapReads; the price has since shot up to $9.99.